Martin Scorsese is an intimate, immediate filmmaker. Through style and storytelling, the veteran director knows how to thrust you into the frame, propelling you with forward motion into the action at hand. In moments both quiet and loud, subdued and bold, he lets his enthusiastic influence been seen and felt in every single frame. That can often be seen in his use of fast dolly zoom shots, which have been a fixture of his works since 1973’s “Mean Streets,” as made evident in the newest video compilation from Vimeo editor Jorge Luengo Ruiz.

READ MORE: Retrospective: The Films Of Martin Scorsese

Using choice shots from classics like “Raging Bull,” “Taxi Driver,” “Goodfellas,” “The Last Temptation Of Christ,” “Casino,” “Cape Fear” and “The Departed,” newer works like “Shutter Island,” “Hugo” and “The Wolf Of Wall Street,” and some of Scorsese’s less-appreciated films, such as “New York, New York,” “The Age Of Innocence,” “Bringing Out The Dead,” “The Aviator” and more, Ruiz highlights the Scorsese’s specific kind of zoom, one he says falls between “the subtle and the obnoxious.” Only when made more evident does it seem so consistent, but once you notice it, he says, it becomes difficult to unsee it. You begin to look for it, in fact. After a point, you notice just how consistently it comes up, even today. The jury’s still out on how often it’ll appear in “Silence,” though we’re still waiting for footage, period.

While we’re left waiting in suspense for that upcoming addition to Scorsese’s résumé, be sure to check out this video below.