At the heart of the upcoming thriller “Luce” is a battle between the title character and his high school teacher. Not a physical struggle, but instead, a battle of wits and psychology, as the two people attempt to convince the other characters, as well as the audience, about who is right and who is wrong. It’s a battle that is beautifully acted thanks to Octavia Spencer and her co-star Kelvin Harrison, Jr.

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And in honor of “Luce” arriving in theaters in a couple of weeks, we are proud to offer our readers a chance to watch an exclusive clip from the film, which not only shows just how tense the relationship between teacher and pupil is in the movie, but also just how great the two actors are in their respective roles.

READ MORE: ‘Luce’: Julius Onah’s Powerfully Constructed Psychodrama Of Race & Social Politics Is Brilliantly Tense [Sundance Review]

We were fortunate enough to see the film at this year’s Sundance. In our review, we said, “Julius Onah‘s powerfully constructed ‘Luce,’ mixes all these socio-political subjects into a provocative Molotov cocktail that shatters, burns and leaves no easy answers.”

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The film stars Naomi Watts, Octavia Spencer, Tim Roth, and Kelvin Harrison, Jr. and is directed by Julius Onah, based on the stage play by J.C. Lee.

“Luce” arrives in theaters on August 2.

Here’s the synopsis:

Certain to be one of the most talked-about films of the year, LUCE is a smart psychological thriller that will leave audiences breathless. An all-star high school athlete and accomplished debater, Luce (Kelvin Harrison Jr.) is a poster boy for the new American Dream. As are his parents (Naomi Watts and Tim Roth), who adopted him from a war-torn country a decade earlier. When Luce’s teacher (Octavia Spencer) makes a shocking discovery in his locker, Luce’s stellar reputation is called into question. But is he really at fault, or is Ms. Wilson preying on dangerous stereotypes?